Tag Archives: HeLa

University of Wisconsin – Madison on board with The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

The University of Wisconsin – Madison is the latest university to have adopted Rebecca Skloot’s The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks for their 2010/11 common reading program. Along with Virginia Commonwealth University, students at the University of Wisconsin – Madison will read this new biography about the woman whose cells, taken without her permission and now known as HeLa cells, have helped in the discovery of medical treatments for everything from polio to leukemia.

In a news release for their Go Big Read program, UW – Madison Chancellor Biddy Martin says of the books adoption, “”In addition to being a great read, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks is cross-disciplinary and relevant, and will engage students and readers on a number of intellectual and personal levels.”

Ken Frazier, director of UW-Madison Libraries and a member of the Go Big Read Steering Committee also stated, “Our reviewers were drawn to this book because it is compelling and readable as a story and intensely interesting in the way it handles complex ethical and scientific issues. I can’t imagine any book that would be a better gateway to the intellectual richness of UW-Madison.”

Has your committee considered The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks? If you have read the book, or read anything about it, let others know what you think by leaving a comment here!

——————————

Order an Exam Copy

More About the Book

Other Posts Featuring The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Leave a comment

Filed under Hear it from them!, One to Watch - New books on the rise!, This just in! - New Adoptions

Virginia Commonwealth University and The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks 

Big news for a great new book!

Rebecca Skloot’s, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks has been selected by Virginia Commonwealth University as common reading for its 2010-11 academic year. Also known to scientists as HeLa, Henrietta Lacks was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells—taken without her knowledge—became one of the most important tools in medicine. Broad in scope, the book unites science and humanities with a powerful story that is still as timely as it was during the life of its namesake.

If you haven’t done so already, comment on this post for your chance to win a FREE copy of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks and keep your eye on this book. We will surely be bringing you more adoption news, information, and resources as Henrietta’s influence continues to grow.

———————

Order an Exam Copy

More About the Book

Other Posts Featuring The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks

Leave a comment

Filed under One to Watch - New books on the rise!, This just in! - New Adoptions

Win a FREE copy of The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks!

We’ve just returned from the annual First-Year Experience conference in Denver, CO and among the many other wonderful titles featured in the Random House, Inc. booth this year was a brand-new hardcover that made a big impression: The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks by Rebecca Skloot. 

Who is Henrietta Lacks? Perhaps you’ve heard of her. Scientists know her as HeLa. She was a poor Southern tobacco farmer who worked the same land as her slave ancestors, yet her cells–taken without her knowledge–became one of the most important tools in medicine. The first “immortal” human cells grown in culture, they are still alive today, though she has been dead for more than sixty years.

Already receiving tremendous buzz, this book has garnered many accolades and much attention from the common reading community. Says David J. Kroll, Professor and Chair of Pharmaceutical Sciences at North Carolina Central University:

What is The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks really about? Science, African American culture and religion, intellectual property of human tissues, Southern history, medical ethics, civil rights, the overselling of medical advances? . . . The book’s broad scope would make it ideal for an institution-wide freshman year reading program.

If you’d like to consider this book for your program, you’re in luck. Random House Academic is giving away five free copies! Comment for your chance to win! (Offer available only in the United States.)

——————–

Order an Exam Copy

Read More Praise

Read an Excerpt

8 Comments

Filed under Giveaways, One to Watch - New books on the rise!